New Testing Quantum Entanglement Under Extreme Conditions

H Hannan

New Testing Quantum Entanglement Under Extreme Conditions
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A remarkable experiment recently tested how resilient quantum entanglement is when subjected to dramatic changes in gravity during a parabolic aeroplane flight.

Entanglement is one of the strangest features of quantum mechanics – it causes particles to remain connected over long distances in ways that seem to defy explanation. This effect is now being harnessed for new technologies like quantum computing and secure communication.

But how robust is entanglement in less-than-ideal conditions outside the lab? To find out, researchers built a compact device that generates entangled photon pairs inside an aeroplane cabin. As the plane flew special parabolic trajectories that induced rapid changes in gravity, from 1.8 times Earth’s gravity to near weightlessness, the device continuously tested entanglement strength.

Remarkably, the results showed entanglement was totally unaffected by these extreme gravity shifts. The particles remained spookily linked just as strongly, whether at high g-forces or floating in microgravity. This demonstrates entanglement and quantum tech are resilient enough for real-world applications like satellite communication.

Reference: L.B. Julius Arthur Bittermann, Sebastian Ecker, Sebastian Philipp Neumann, Matthias Fink, Martin Bohmann, Nicolai Friis, Marcus Huber, and Rupert Ursin, Photonic entanglement during a zero-g flight, (2024-02-15).

Image: https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2024-02-15-1256

The study also provides a reference for future experiments on more extreme acceleration effects on quantum systems. As lead author Julius Bittermann says, “Our experiment sets new standards for the durability of quantum-communication setups.” So get ready for space-based quantum networks, as even alien gravities can’t break quantum connections!

Reference: L.B. Julius Arthur Bittermann, Sebastian Ecker, Sebastian Philipp Neumann, Matthias Fink, Martin Bohmann, Nicolai Friis, Marcus Huber, and Rupert Ursin, Photonic entanglement during a zero-g flight, (2024-02-15).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2024-02-15-1256

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